Directions

Imperial College has its own detailed information on general directions and on getting to the theoretical physics group. The College is located on Prince Consort Road, south of Hyde Park (map). The most convenient access is via tube (South Kensington, Gloucester Road) or buses. The Theoretical Physics group resides on the 5th floor of the Huxley Building. The group also possesses its own description.

Seminars at Imperial College

Found at least 20 result(s)

01.05.2019 (Wednesday)

TBA

Regular Seminar Wout Merbis (ULB)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

10.04.2019 (Wednesday)

Looking for Partially-Massless Gravity

Regular Seminar Karapet Mkrtchyan (Potsdam)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

We study the possibility for a unitary theory of partially-massless (PM) spin-two field interacting with Gravity in arbitrary dimensions. We show that parity invariant interactions respecting general covariance lead to a reconstruction of Conformal Gravity in even dimensions. In this case the unitarity is sacrificed. By relaxing the parity invariance, we find a possibility of a unitary theory in four dimensions, but the parity-odd cubic vertex cannot be written in usual metric variables. We comment on possible approaches that may allow for the formulation of this theory. Finally, by relaxing the general covariance, we show that a non-minimal coupling between massless and PM spin-two fields may lead to an alternative possibility of a unitary theory, that necessarily involves mixed-symmetry fields.

02.04.2019 (Tuesday)

TBA

Regular Seminar Andreas Albrecht (UC Davis)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

27.03.2019 (Wednesday)

Infrared enhancement of supersymmetry in four dimensions

Regular Seminar Simone Giacomelli (Oxford)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

In this seminar I will discuss a recently-found class of RG flows in four dimensions exhibiting enhancement of supersymmetry in the infrared, which provides a lagrangian description of several strongly-coupled N=2 SCFTs. The procedure involves starting from a N=2 SCFT, coupling a chiral multiplet in the adjoint representation of the global symmetry to the moment map of the SCFT and turning on a nilpotent expectation value for this chiral. We show that, combining considerations based on 't Hooft anomaly matching and basic results about the N=2 superconformal algebra, it is possible to understand in detail the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and formulate a simple criterion for supersymmetry enhancement.

26.03.2019 (Tuesday)

TBA

Regular Seminar Sergej Moroz (TU Munich)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

19.03.2019 (Tuesday)

TBA

Regular Seminar Andres Collinucci (ULB)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

15.03.2019 (Friday)

Integrability, Poisson-Lie Symmetry and Double Field Theory

Regular Seminar Hassler Falk (University of Oviedo)

at:
14:00 IC
room SAF 119
abstract:

I review how integrability allows us to explore the planar limit of the AdS/CFT correspondence for arbitrary values of the t'Hooft coupling. In string theory integrability of the 2D σ-model is closely related to Poisson-Lie Symmetry. Double Field Theory can be used to make this symmetry manifest and therewith provides a new tool to study the implications for the gravity side of the correspondence.

13.03.2019 (Wednesday)

Holographic Complexity in Vaidya Spacetimes

Regular Seminar Shira Chapman (University of Amsterdam)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

We investigate holographic complexity for eternal black hole backgrounds perturbed by shock waves, with both the complexity=action (CA) and complexity=volume (CV) proposals. We consider Vaidya geometries describing a thin shell of null fluid with arbitrary energy falling in from one of the boundaries of a two-sided AdS-Schwarzschild spacetime. We demonstrate how scrambling and chaos are imprinted in the complexity of formation and in the full time evolution of complexity via the switchback effect for light shocks, as well as analogous properties for heavy ones.

12.03.2019 (Tuesday)

TBA

Regular Seminar Costas Bachas (ENS Paris)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

06.03.2019 (Wednesday)

Soft Heisenberg Hair

Triangular Seminar Daniel Grumiller (TU Wien)

at:
16:30 IC
room Blackett LT2
abstract:

Gravity theories naturally allow for edge states generated by non-trivial boundary-condition preserving diffeomorphisms. I present a specific set of boundary conditions inspired by near horizon physics, show that it leads to soft hair excitations of black hole solutions and discuss implications for black hole entropy.

06.03.2019 (Wednesday)

Schwinger-Keldysh effective field theories

Triangular Seminar Natalia Pinzani Fokeeva (KU Leuven)

at:
15:00 IC
room Blackett LT2
abstract:

I will discuss novel effective field theories for hydrodynamics. After identifying the relevant low-energy degrees of freedom, I will show how the symmetries of the problem can be efficiently implemented using supersymmetry. Interestingly, a conserved entropy current naturally arises as a Noether current in superspace. If time permits, I will also show how to derive such effective actions from holography.

06.03.2019 (Wednesday)

tba

Triangular Seminar Natalia Pinzani Fokeeva (KU Leuven)

at:
15:00 IC
room tba
abstract:

05.03.2019 (Tuesday)

Rationalizing CFTs

Regular Seminar Matthew Buican (QMUL)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

2D rational conformal field theories (RCFTs) are typically thought of as being the “nicest” interesting CFTs we can study: They have large enough symmetry so that there are only a finite number of primary fields, but they also have applications to the real world (e.g., to various condensed matter systems). In this talk, I will describe a program that aims to understand connections between exotic 4D theories with N=2 superconformal symmetry and more down-to-earth 2D RCFTs, thereby enriching our understanding of both.

19.02.2019 (Tuesday)

New routes to scattering on curved backgrounds

Regular Seminar Tim Adamo (Imperial College)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

There are many reasons to consider perturbative QFT around curved backgrounds, but it is often difficult to perform explicit computations in these settings. Progress in the study of scattering amplitudes (around a trivial background) suggests alternative perspectives to space-time Lagrangians and Feynman rules which could enable progress in the study of scattering on curved backgrounds. I will discuss one such alternative, known as double copy, with a particular focus on gluon and graviton scattering around non-linear plane wave backgrounds

13.02.2019 (Wednesday)

Gauge theories phases of 5d SCFTs: an M-theory/type IIA perpective

Regular Seminar Cyril Closset ()

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

I will revisit the well-known construction of 5d SCFTs from M-theory on a CY3 singularity. Upon massive deformation, such 5d SCFTs are often expected to have 5d N=1 supersymmetric gauge theory descriptions at low energy. I will present a new way to study these 5d ``gauge theory phases'' systematically using type-IIA string theory, and I will comment on the phenomenon of "UV duality." Along the way, I will discuss some slightly subtle properties of the 5d N=1 Coulomb branch prepotential.

05.02.2019 (Tuesday)

Topologically Ordered Matter and Why You Should be Interested

Regular Seminar Steven Simon (Oxford)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

In two dimensional topological phases of matter, processes depend on gross topology rather than detailed geometry. Thinking in 2+1 dimensions, particle world lines can be interpreted as knots or links, and the amplitude for certain processes becomes a topological invariant of that link. While sounding rather exotic, we believe that such phases of matter not only exist, but have actually been observed in quantum Hall experiments, and could provide a uniquely practical route to building a quantum computer. Possibilities have also been proposed for creating similar physics in systems ranging from superfluid helium to strontium ruthenate to semiconductor-superconductor junctions to quantum wires to spin systems to graphene to cold atoms.

09.01.2019 (Wednesday)

General lessons on 4d SCFTs from Geometry

Regular Seminar Mario Martone (UT Austin)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

The geometry of the moduli space of 4d \mathcal{N}=2 moduli spaces, and in particular of their Coulomb branches (CBs), is very constrained. In this talk I will show that through its careful study, we can learn general and somewhat surprising lessons about the properties of \mathcal{N}=2 super conformal field theories (SCFTs). Specifically I will show that we can prove that the scaling dimension of CB coordinates, and thus of the corresponding operator at the SCFT fixed point, has to be rational and it has a rank-dependent maximum value and that in general the moduli spaces of \mathcal{N}=2 SCFTs can have metric singularities as well as complex structure singularities. Finally I will outline how we can explicitly perform a classification of geometries of \mathcal{N}\geq3 SCFTs and carry out the program up to rank-2. The results are surprising and exciting in many ways.

18.12.2018 (Tuesday)

TBA

Regular Seminar Tommi Tenkanen (QMUL)

at:
13:30 IC
room H503
abstract:

28.11.2018 (Wednesday)

Reconstructing AdS3/CFT2 correlators

Regular Seminar Rodolfo Russo (QMUL)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

The AdS/CFT duality maps supersymmetric heavy operators with conformal dimension of the order of the central charge to asymptotically AdS supergravity solutions. I'll show how, by studying the quadratic fluctuations around such backgrounds, it is possible to derive 4-point correlators of two light and two heavy states in the supergravity approximation. Then by using this input, I'll discuss how to reconstruct standard supergravity correlators between four (single particle) operators. I'll present some explicit examples in the AdS3 setup relevant for the duality with the D1-D5 CFT.

23.11.2018 (Friday)

Goldstone pairs at the Fermi surface

Exceptional Seminar Alberto Nicolis (Columbia)

at:
14:00 IC
room H503
abstract:

I will adapt the Goldstone theorem to spontaneously broken boosts, and show that, while still predicting gapless Goldstone states, it is quite forgiving regarding the nature of such states. In particular, I will show that while for solids and superfluids the role of the boost Goldstone states is played by phonon single-particle states, for a Fermi liquid such a role is played by the particle-hole continuum, that is, by two-particle states.